Quick Answer: What Does Hast Mean In Shakespeare?

What does thee mean in Shakespeare?

Shakespeare’s Pronouns “Thou” for “you” (nominative, as in “Thou hast risen.”) “Thee” for “you” (objective, as in “I give this to thee.”) “Thy” for “your” (genitive, as in “Thy dagger floats before thee.”) “Thine” for “yours” (possessive, as in “What’s mine is thine.”).

What does prithee mean in modern English?

Prithee is an archaic English interjection formed from a corruption of the phrase pray thee ([I] ask you [to]), which was initially an exclamation of contempt used to indicate a subject’s triviality. … Prithee was almost always used as a parenthesis in order to introduce indirect questions and requests.

What does marry mean in Old English?

Middle English from Old French marier, from Latin maritare, from maritus, literally ‘married’, (as a noun) ‘husband’.

Does thy mean my?

“Thy” is an English word that means “your” in the second person singular. … Singular: thou, thee, thy. Plural: ye, you, your.

What does hath mean in Shakespeare?

verb. archaic, or dialect (used with the pronouns he, she, or it or a singular noun) a form of the present tense (indicative mood) of have.

What does thy mean in Shakespeare?

“Thee” for “you” (objective, as in “I give this to thee.”) “Thy” for “your” (genitive, as in “Thy dagger floats before thee.”) “Thine” for “yours” (possessive, as in “What’s mine is thine.”)

What does sirrah mean in Shakespeare?

Sirrah is an archaic term used to address inferiors, sometimes as an expression of contempt (but not as familiar). The term appears in several Shakespeare plays, such as Julius Caesar, Othello, Antony and Cleopatra, Twelfth Night and the Merchant of Venice.

What is Hast in modern English?

Hast is the original second-person singular present tense of to have and is now largely archaic, having been superseded by have. … It corresponds to the familiar second-person singular present tense of to have in some other European languages.

How do I use hast?

Hast is an old-fashioned second person singular form of the verb ‘have. ‘ It is used with ‘thou’ which is an old-fashioned form of ‘you.

What does Haveth mean?

hath in British English (hæθ ) verb. archaic or dialect (used with the pronouns he, she, or it or a singular noun) a form of the present tense (indicative mood) of have.

What does an mean in Shakespeare?

But that doesn’t actually clue us into what Shakespearean means. It does seem a term that falls into two categories: (a) a term used to denote high quality, or (b) a term used to denote a certain type of story. Sometimes it is used to indicate both of these things at the same time.

What does hast mean?

saying have or hadverb. The definition of hast is an old way of saying have or had. An example of hast is how the writings in the Bible say the word have; thou hast.

What does Fain mean in Shakespeare?

fain. adverb. Definition of fain (Entry 2 of 2) 1 : with pleasure : gladly a speech of fire that fain would blaze— William Shakespeare. 2a : by preference knew it, too, though he would fain not admit it publicly— John Lukacs.